whatwearelookingat:

Ralph Lemon at The Studio Museum in Harlem:

Drawing from an eight-year project by New York-based movement artist Ralph Lemon (b. 1952, Cincinnati) in conjunction with Little Yazoo, Mississippi resident Walter Carter (1907–2010), 1856 Cessna Road explores a friendship that evolved into a close collaboration and features digital animation, large-scale color photographs and a video installation.

Ralph Lemon is a dancer, choreographer, writer and visual artist, and is the Artistic Director of Cross Performance, which he founded in 1995. In 2004, Lemon concluded the ten-year project The Geography Trilogy. Lemon’s most recent multimedia performance, How Can You Stay in the House All Day and Not Go Anywhere? (2008–10), included the installation Meditation.

Kenny Rogers & The First Edition - Just Dropped In

amare-habeo:

Armand Vanderlick (Belgian, 1897-1985), Femme à la robe orange [Woman in an orange dress], 1944.

amare-habeo:

Armand Vanderlick (Belgian, 1897-1985), Femme à la robe orange [Woman in an orange dress], 1944.

(via nwxx)

See how that powerful individual Marx is treated, in whose honour hundreds of thousands of fanatics raise their arms to the sky, promising to religiously observe his doctrine! Doesn’t an entire party, a whole army with several dozens of deputies in the German Parliament, now interpret that Marxist doctrine in a precisely opposite sense to the thought of the master? He declared that economic power determines the political form of societies, and now his followers affirm that economic power will depend on a party majority in the Political Assemblies. He proclaimed that ‘the State, to abolish pauperism, must abolish itself, for the essence of evil lies in the very existence of the State!’ And in his shadow his followers devote themselves to conquering and directing the State! If the politics of Marx triumph, it will be, like the religion of Christ, only on the condition that the master, adored in appearance, be disowned in practice.
Elisée Reclus, Le Socialisme en danger, 1897
At what point does ironic mimicry of the symptoms of an unjust order become a genuflection to that order? If you claim to mock a regime while accepting both its actual patronage and adopting its tropes and gestures with comic flair, you are not a subversive — you are a court jester.
Mostafa Heddaya
grupaok:

Graham Sutherland, The Setting Sun, 1944

grupaok:

Graham Sutherland, The Setting Sun, 1944

grupaok:

Leszek Kołakowski and Henri Lefebvre, 1971

grupaok:

Leszek Kołakowski and Henri Lefebvre, 1971

…we defend the necessity of utopia as the durable record of proletarian subjectivity — an image encompassing all promises made to it and all memories of its past. It is only in view of this image, utopia, that the proletariat is able to maintain a relationship with its impossibility as a class. It is of its own nothingness, ultimately, that value thinks when “thinking its own sublation” — as in, ‘We would be nothing without capital.’ Communism is the movement that makes this nothing into everything.
Night Workers, Notes on Marxist Art History [via Third Rail Quarterly] (via grupaok)

Final Fantasy — “An Actor’s Revenge” Fun Fun Fun Fest 2007 (Destroyer cover)

"What to read?" is a recurring dilemma in my life. The question always conjures up an image: a woman at home, half-dressed, moving restlessly from room to room, picking up a book, reading a page or two and no sooner feeling her mind drift, telling herself, “You should be reading something else, you should be doing something else.” The image also has a mise-en-scène: overstuffed, disorderly shelves of dusty and yellowing books, many of them unread; books in piles around the bed or faced down on a table; work prints of photographs, also with a faint covering of dust, taped to the walls of the studio; a pile of bills; a sink full of dishes. She is trying to concentrate on the page in front of her but a distracting blip in her head travels from one desultory scene to the next, each one competing for her attention. It is not just a question of which book will absorb her, for there are plenty that will do that, but rather, which book, in a nearly cosmic sense, will choose her, redeem her. Often what is at stake, should she want to spell it out, is the idea that something is missing, as in: what is the crucial bit of urgently needed knowledge that will save her, at least for this day? She has the idea that if she can simply plug into the right book then all will be calm, still, and right with the world.
Moyra Davey, The Problem of Reading  (via tweepoppy)
Moyra Davey

Moyra Davey

To be making something as yet unformed, unknown—to be living in a deferred moment—is the most seductive way to exist.
Moyra Davey, “Polyvalence” (via silentfrenzies)