The Colombian novelist Alvaro Mutis used to tell a story about his close friend and compatriot Gabriel García Márquez, who has died aged 87. In the mid-Sixties, when the latter was writing One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), they met every evening for a drink. García Márquez would tell Mutis about the scenes he’d written that day, and Mutis would listen, waiting avidly for the next installment. He started telling their friends that “Gabo” – as García Márquez was affectionately known – was writing a book in which a man called X did Y, and so on. When the novel was published, however, it bore no relation to the story García Márquez had told over tequila – not the characters or the plot or any aspect at all. Mutis was left with the feeling of having been brilliantly duped, and he mourned the unwritten novel of the bar, that ephemeral fiction no one else would ever hear.

Isaiah Rashad - Cilvia Demo (Full Album)

Αιμάτινες Σκιές από Απόσταση

Sitting in the hut, the air stale and the light almost nonexistent, I thought of something [Dougald] Hine told me earlier. “People think that abandoning belief in progress, abandoning the belief that if we try hard enough we can fix this mess, is a nihilistic position,” Hine said. “They think we’re saying: ‘Screw it. Nothing matters.’ But in fact all we’re saying is: ‘Let’s not pretend we’re not feeling despair. Let’s sit with it for a while. Let’s be honest with ourselves and with each other. And then as our eyes adjust to the darkness, what do we start to notice?’”
part of the terror was finding the edges weren’t there
bpNichol
jeandonnelly:

afilreis:

1944 recording of Muriel Rukeyser now added to PennSound (thanks to Christina Davis & the Woodberry Poetry Room): http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Rukeyser.php#1944

Letter to the Front, Sections 1, 3 & 10 (1944) - 4:19

jeandonnelly:

afilreis:

1944 recording of Muriel Rukeyser now added to PennSound (thanks to Christina Davis & the Woodberry Poetry Room): http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Rukeyser.php#1944

Letter to the Front, Sections 1, 3 & 10 (1944) - 4:19

amospoe:

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” ― Arthur C. Clarke, Profiles of the Future: An Inquiry Into the Limits of the Possible

amospoe:

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” 
― Arthur C. ClarkeProfiles of the Future: An Inquiry Into the Limits of the Possible

(via boardnroom)

1109-83:

Arturas Bumšteinas, “Sentences on Conceptual Art (Instrumental Version)”, 20??

1109-83:

Arturas Bumšteinas, “Sentences on Conceptual Art (Instrumental Version)”, 20??

Geeshie Wiley - Last Kind Words

hatelife24-7:

MUST READ INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM

hatelife24-7:

MUST READ INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM

Today my fortune cookie said: “The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance.” After some consideration, I really don’t think this is true.
melvillehouse:

"I should have preferred," he said with his voice of dead lovers crying through the earth, "to be fit for you to look at." Then he deliberately set himself on fire."
—Mina Loy, Insel, 9781612193533
Preorder from an indie here.
Mina Loy wrote about artists the way nobody else has since. This is like a feminist Blake among the surrealists. Like Patti Smith before Patti Smith. Don’t screw around, you want this one.

melvillehouse:

"I should have preferred," he said with his voice of dead lovers crying through the earth, "to be fit for you to look at." Then he deliberately set himself on fire."

—Mina Loy, Insel, 9781612193533

Preorder from an indie here.

Mina Loy wrote about artists the way nobody else has since. This is like a feminist Blake among the surrealists. Like Patti Smith before Patti Smith. Don’t screw around, you want this one.

The obsession with suicide is characteristic of the man who can neither live nor die, and whose attention never swerves from this double impossibility.
Emil Cioran (via funeralfaerie)

(via funeralfaerie)

The Curator is expected to know the difference between good and bad art, select relevant examples from the good, and arrange them into consequent, thematically resonant exhibitions. Works should complement each other rather than clash. Themes should be relevant and sophisticated. Perverse Curating says fuck that. Why must art be well-behaved and why is it the curators job the color within the lines? Who is willing to put art together in provocative ways that defy all notions of politeness and common sense? Instead of works that complement each other, what if the art was at war? Would a more perverse, combative form of exhibition-making, over time, lead to more exciting art?

Perverse Curating

Jacob Wren

(via emmainbern)